Science






New Baby Dinosaur Fossil Reveals Cause of Death

November 26, 2013 | by Lisa Winter






Photo credit: Philip J. Currie, Robert Holmes, Michael Ryan Clive Coy, Eva B. Koppelhus

 315K  1401  284 reddit460 googleplus202
It’s a pretty rare event to find complete fossils in good condition. After millions of years any number of things could happen to destroy fossils before they are discovered and documented by scientists, if the animal even fossilizes at all. Finding well preserved baby animals is particularly hard, since they are more likely to have gotten trampled or eaten after their death. Phillip Currie from the University of Alberta has recently uncovered a juvenile Chasmosaurus belli that was so complete and intact, he was actually able to speculate about the cause of death.
Chasmosaurus belli is commonly found in British Columbia, Canada. It is a relative of the triceratops and has the familiar ornamental frill. Up to this point, all of the skeletons have been adults. Random bones of smaller dinosaurs have been discovered, but lacked the context of a full animal. The discovery of the 70-million-year-old juvenile, which was only about three years old at the time of death, reveals important clues about how the dinosaur grew and changed over the course of its life. As it turns out, the young C. bellis look a lot like the adults, just smaller. The newly-discovered young dino was about three years old at the time of its death, measuring about 5 feet (1.5 meters) long. Adults grew to be about 15 feet (5 meters) long, though the body plan is essentially unchanged. Other baby dinosaurs have proportionally longer legs to keep up with quick-moving adults, but that does not seem to be the case with this species.
The fossil was found in what used to be a riverbed. This has led Currie and his research team to believe that the baby didn’t die at the hands of a larger creature. It most likely wandered out too far into the water and got caught in the current. Unable to save itself, it drowned and settled at the bottom of the river, where it would eventually become fossilized in the sediment. The body was so well preserved, Currie was actually able to see impressions from the baby’s skin in the surrounding rock. The team hopes to use this fossil to gain a deeper understanding of how C. belli lived and how it existed in the context of its ecosystem.
- See more at: http://www.iflscience.com/plants-and-animals/new-baby-dinosaur-fossil-reveals-cause-death#sthash.6M3s821T.dpuf






New Baby Dinosaur Fossil Reveals Cause of Death

November 26, 2013 | by Lisa Winter






Photo credit: Philip J. Currie, Robert Holmes, Michael Ryan Clive Coy, Eva B. Koppelhus

 315K  1401  284 reddit460 googleplus202
It’s a pretty rare event to find complete fossils in good condition. After millions of years any number of things could happen to destroy fossils before they are discovered and documented by scientists, if the animal even fossilizes at all. Finding well preserved baby animals is particularly hard, since they are more likely to have gotten trampled or eaten after their death. Phillip Currie from the University of Alberta has recently uncovered a juvenile Chasmosaurus belli that was so complete and intact, he was actually able to speculate about the cause of death.
Chasmosaurus belli is commonly found in British Columbia, Canada. It is a relative of the triceratops and has the familiar ornamental frill. Up to this point, all of the skeletons have been adults. Random bones of smaller dinosaurs have been discovered, but lacked the context of a full animal. The discovery of the 70-million-year-old juvenile, which was only about three years old at the time of death, reveals important clues about how the dinosaur grew and changed over the course of its life. As it turns out, the young C. bellis look a lot like the adults, just smaller. The newly-discovered young dino was about three years old at the time of its death, measuring about 5 feet (1.5 meters) long. Adults grew to be about 15 feet (5 meters) long, though the body plan is essentially unchanged. Other baby dinosaurs have proportionally longer legs to keep up with quick-moving adults, but that does not seem to be the case with this species.
The fossil was found in what used to be a riverbed. This has led Currie and his research team to believe that the baby didn’t die at the hands of a larger creature. It most likely wandered out too far into the water and got caught in the current. Unable to save itself, it drowned and settled at the bottom of the river, where it would eventually become fossilized in the sediment. The body was so well preserved, Currie was actually able to see impressions from the baby’s skin in the surrounding rock. The team hopes to use this fossil to gain a deeper understanding of how C. belli lived and how it existed in the context of its ecosystem.
- See more at: http://www.iflscience.com/plants-and-animals/new-baby-dinosaur-fossil-reveals-cause-death#sthash.6M3s821T.dpuf





New Baby Dinosaur Fossil Reveals Cause of Death

November 26, 2013 | by Lisa Winter






Photo credit: Philip J. Currie, Robert Holmes, Michael Ryan Clive Coy, Eva B. Koppelhus

 315K  1401  284 reddit460 googleplus202
It’s a pretty rare event to find complete fossils in good condition. After millions of years any number of things could happen to destroy fossils before they are discovered and documented by scientists, if the animal even fossilizes at all. Finding well preserved baby animals is particularly hard, since they are more likely to have gotten trampled or eaten after their death. Phillip Currie from the University of Alberta has recently uncovered a juvenile Chasmosaurus belli that was so complete and intact, he was actually able to speculate about the cause of death.
Chasmosaurus belli is commonly found in British Columbia, Canada. It is a relative of the triceratops and has the familiar ornamental frill. Up to this point, all of the skeletons have been adults. Random bones of smaller dinosaurs have been discovered, but lacked the context of a full animal. The discovery of the 70-million-year-old juvenile, which was only about three years old at the time of death, reveals important clues about how the dinosaur grew and changed over the course of its life. As it turns out, the young C. bellis look a lot like the adults, just smaller. The newly-discovered young dino was about three years old at the time of its death, measuring about 5 feet (1.5 meters) long. Adults grew to be about 15 feet (5 meters) long, though the body plan is essentially unchanged. Other baby dinosaurs have proportionally longer legs to keep up with quick-moving adults, but that does not seem to be the case with this species.
The fossil was found in what used to be a riverbed. This has led Currie and his research team to believe that the baby didn’t die at the hands of a larger creature. It most likely wandered out too far into the water and got caught in the current. Unable to save itself, it drowned and settled at the bottom of the river, where it would eventually become fossilized in the sediment. The body was so well preserved, Currie was actually able to see impressions from the baby’s skin in the surrounding rock. The team hopes to use this fossil to gain a deeper understanding of how C. belli lived and how it existed in the context of its ecosystem.
- See more at: http://www.iflscience.com/plants-and-animals/new-baby-dinosaur-fossil-reveals-cause-death#sthash.6M3s821T.dpuf





New Baby Dinosaur Fossil Reveals Cause of Death

November 26, 2013 | by Lisa Winter






Photo credit: Philip J. Currie, Robert Holmes, Michael Ryan Clive Coy, Eva B. Koppelhus

 315K  1401  284 reddit460 googleplus202
It’s a pretty rare event to find complete fossils in good condition. After millions of years any number of things could happen to destroy fossils before they are discovered and documented by scientists, if the animal even fossilizes at all. Finding well preserved baby animals is particularly hard, since they are more likely to have gotten trampled or eaten after their death. Phillip Currie from the University of Alberta has recently uncovered a juvenile Chasmosaurus belli that was so complete and intact, he was actually able to speculate about the cause of death.
Chasmosaurus belli is commonly found in British Columbia, Canada. It is a relative of the triceratops and has the familiar ornamental frill. Up to this point, all of the skeletons have been adults. Random bones of smaller dinosaurs have been discovered, but lacked the context of a full animal. The discovery of the 70-million-year-old juvenile, which was only about three years old at the time of death, reveals important clues about how the dinosaur grew and changed over the course of its life. As it turns out, the young C. bellis look a lot like the adults, just smaller. The newly-discovered young dino was about three years old at the time of its death, measuring about 5 feet (1.5 meters) long. Adults grew to be about 15 feet (5 meters) long, though the body plan is essentially unchanged. Other baby dinosaurs have proportionally longer legs to keep up with quick-moving adults, but that does not seem to be the case with this species.
The fossil was found in what used to be a riverbed. This has led Currie and his research team to believe that the baby didn’t die at the hands of a larger creature. It most likely wandered out too far into the water and got caught in the current. Unable to save itself, it drowned and settled at the bottom of the river, where it would eventually become fossilized in the sediment. The body was so well preserved, Currie was actually able to see impressions from the baby’s skin in the surrounding rock. The team hopes to use this fossil to gain a deeper understanding of how C. belli lived and how it existed in the context of its ecosystem.
- See more at: http://www.iflscience.com/plants-and-animals/new-baby-dinosaur-fossil-reveals-cause-death#sthash.6M3s821T.dpuf





New Baby Dinosaur Fossil Reveals Cause of Death

November 26, 2013 | by Lisa Winter






Photo credit: Philip J. Currie, Robert Holmes, Michael Ryan Clive Coy, Eva B. Koppelhus

 315K  1401  284 reddit460 googleplus202
It’s a pretty rare event to find complete fossils in good condition. After millions of years any number of things could happen to destroy fossils before they are discovered and documented by scientists, if the animal even fossilizes at all. Finding well preserved baby animals is particularly hard, since they are more likely to have gotten trampled or eaten after their death. Phillip Currie from the University of Alberta has recently uncovered a juvenile Chasmosaurus belli that was so complete and intact, he was actually able to speculate about the cause of death.
Chasmosaurus belli is commonly found in British Columbia, Canada. It is a relative of the triceratops and has the familiar ornamental frill. Up to this point, all of the skeletons have been adults. Random bones of smaller dinosaurs have been discovered, but lacked the context of a full animal. The discovery of the 70-million-year-old juvenile, which was only about three years old at the time of death, reveals important clues about how the dinosaur grew and changed over the course of its life. As it turns out, the young C. bellis look a lot like the adults, just smaller. The newly-discovered young dino was about three years old at the time of its death, measuring about 5 feet (1.5 meters) long. Adults grew to be about 15 feet (5 meters) long, though the body plan is essentially unchanged. Other baby dinosaurs have proportionally longer legs to keep up with quick-moving adults, but that does not seem to be the case with this species.
The fossil was found in what used to be a riverbed. This has led Currie and his research team to believe that the baby didn’t die at the hands of a larger creature. It most likely wandered out too far into the water and got caught in the current. Unable to save itself, it drowned and settled at the bottom of the river, where it would eventually become fossilized in the sediment. The body was so well preserved, Currie was actually able to see impressions from the baby’s skin in the surrounding rock. The team hopes to use this fossil to gain a deeper understanding of how C. belli lived and how it existed in the context of its ecosystem.
- See more at: http://www.iflscience.com/plants-and-animals/new-baby-dinosaur-fossil-reveals-cause-death#sthash.6M3s821T.dpuf





New Baby Dinosaur Fossil Reveals Cause of Death

November 26, 2013 | by Lisa Winter





Photo credit: Philip J. Currie, Robert Holmes, Michael Ryan Clive Coy, Eva B. Koppelhus

 315K  1401  284 reddit460 googleplus202
It’s a pretty rare event to find complete fossils in good condition. After millions of years any number of things could happen to destroy fossils before they are discovered and documented by scientists, if the animal even fossilizes at all. Finding well preserved baby animals is particularly hard, since they are more likely to have gotten trampled or eaten after their death. Phillip Currie from the University of Alberta has recently uncovered a juvenile Chasmosaurus belli that was so complete and intact, he was actually able to speculate about the cause of death.
Chasmosaurus belli is commonly found in British Columbia, Canada. It is a relative of the triceratops and has the familiar ornamental frill. Up to this point, all of the skeletons have been adults. Random bones of smaller dinosaurs have been discovered, but lacked the context of a full animal. The discovery of the 70-million-year-old juvenile, which was only about three years old at the time of death, reveals important clues about how the dinosaur grew and changed over the course of its life. As it turns out, the young C. bellis look a lot like the adults, just smaller. The newly-discovered young dino was about three years old at the time of its death, measuring about 5 feet (1.5 meters) long. Adults grew to be about 15 feet (5 meters) long, though the body plan is essentially unchanged. Other baby dinosaurs have proportionally longer legs to keep up with quick-moving adults, but that does not seem to be the case with this species.
The fossil was found in what used to be a riverbed. This has led Currie and his research team to believe that the baby didn’t die at the hands of a larger creature. It most likely wandered out too far into the water and got caught in the current. Unable to save itself, it drowned and settled at the bottom of the river, where it would eventually become fossilized in the sediment. The body was so well preserved, Currie was actually able to see impressions from the baby’s skin in the surrounding rock. The team hopes to use this fossil to gain a deeper understanding of how C. belli lived and how it existed in the context of its ecosystem.
- See more at: http://www.iflscience.com/plants-and-animals/new-baby-dinosaur-fossil-reveals-cause-death#sthash.6M3s821T.dpuf




New Baby Dinosaur Fossil Reveals Cause of Death

November 26, 2013 | by Lisa Winter





Photo credit: Philip J. Currie, Robert Holmes, Michael Ryan Clive Coy, Eva B. Koppelhus

 315K  1401  284 reddit460 googleplus202
It’s a pretty rare event to find complete fossils in good condition. After millions of years any number of things could happen to destroy fossils before they are discovered and documented by scientists, if the animal even fossilizes at all. Finding well preserved baby animals is particularly hard, since they are more likely to have gotten trampled or eaten after their death. Phillip Currie from the University of Alberta has recently uncovered a juvenile Chasmosaurus belli that was so complete and intact, he was actually able to speculate about the cause of death.
Chasmosaurus belli is commonly found in British Columbia, Canada. It is a relative of the triceratops and has the familiar ornamental frill. Up to this point, all of the skeletons have been adults. Random bones of smaller dinosaurs have been discovered, but lacked the context of a full animal. The discovery of the 70-million-year-old juvenile, which was only about three years old at the time of death, reveals important clues about how the dinosaur grew and changed over the course of its life. As it turns out, the young C. bellis look a lot like the adults, just smaller. The newly-discovered young dino was about three years old at the time of its death, measuring about 5 feet (1.5 meters) long. Adults grew to be about 15 feet (5 meters) long, though the body plan is essentially unchanged. Other baby dinosaurs have proportionally longer legs to keep up with quick-moving adults, but that does not seem to be the case with this species.
The fossil was found in what used to be a riverbed. This has led Currie and his research team to believe that the baby didn’t die at the hands of a larger creature. It most likely wandered out too far into the water and got caught in the current. Unable to save itself, it drowned and settled at the bottom of the river, where it would eventually become fossilized in the sediment. The body was so well preserved, Currie was actually able to see impressions from the baby’s skin in the surrounding rock. The team hopes to use this fossil to gain a deeper understanding of how C. belli lived and how it existed in the context of its ecosystem.
- See more at: http://www.iflscience.com/plants-and-animals/new-baby-dinosaur-fossil-reveals-cause-death#sthash.6M3s821T.dpuf





New Baby Dinosaur Fossil Reveals Cause of Death

November 26, 2013 | by Lisa Winter





Photo credit: Philip J. Currie, Robert Holmes, Michael Ryan Clive Coy, Eva B. Koppelhus

 315K  1401  284 reddit460 googleplus202
It’s a pretty rare event to find complete fossils in good condition. After millions of years any number of things could happen to destroy fossils before they are discovered and documented by scientists, if the animal even fossilizes at all. Finding well preserved baby animals is particularly hard, since they are more likely to have gotten trampled or eaten after their death. Phillip Currie from the University of Alberta has recently uncovered a juvenile Chasmosaurus belli that was so complete and intact, he was actually able to speculate about the cause of death.
Chasmosaurus belli is commonly found in British Columbia, Canada. It is a relative of the triceratops and has the familiar ornamental frill. Up to this point, all of the skeletons have been adults. Random bones of smaller dinosaurs have been discovered, but lacked the context of a full animal. The discovery of the 70-million-year-old juvenile, which was only about three years old at the time of death, reveals important clues about how the dinosaur grew and changed over the course of its life. As it turns out, the young C. bellis look a lot like the adults, just smaller. The newly-discovered young dino was about three years old at the time of its death, measuring about 5 feet (1.5 meters) long. Adults grew to be about 15 feet (5 meters) long, though the body plan is essentially unchanged. Other baby dinosaurs have proportionally longer legs to keep up with quick-moving adults, but that does not seem to be the case with this species.
The fossil was found in what used to be a riverbed. This has led Currie and his research team to believe that the baby didn’t die at the hands of a larger creature. It most likely wandered out too far into the water and got caught in the current. Unable to save itself, it drowned and settled at the bottom of the river, where it would eventually become fossilized in the sediment. The body was so well preserved, Currie was actually able to see impressions from the baby’s skin in the surrounding rock. The team hopes to use this fossil to gain a deeper understanding of how C. belli lived and how it existed in the context of its ecosystem.
- See more at: http://www.iflscience.com/plants-and-animals/new-baby-dinosaur-fossil-reveals-cause-death#sthash.6M3s821T.dpuf




New Baby Dinosaur Fossil Reveals Cause of Death

November 26, 2013 | by Lisa Winter





Photo credit: Philip J. Currie, Robert Holmes, Michael Ryan Clive Coy, Eva B. Koppelhus

 315K  1401  284 reddit460 googleplus202
It’s a pretty rare event to find complete fossils in good condition. After millions of years any number of things could happen to destroy fossils before they are discovered and documented by scientists, if the animal even fossilizes at all. Finding well preserved baby animals is particularly hard, since they are more likely to have gotten trampled or eaten after their death. Phillip Currie from the University of Alberta has recently uncovered a juvenile Chasmosaurus belli that was so complete and intact, he was actually able to speculate about the cause of death.
Chasmosaurus belli is commonly found in British Columbia, Canada. It is a relative of the triceratops and has the familiar ornamental frill. Up to this point, all of the skeletons have been adults. Random bones of smaller dinosaurs have been discovered, but lacked the context of a full animal. The discovery of the 70-million-year-old juvenile, which was only about three years old at the time of death, reveals important clues about how the dinosaur grew and changed over the course of its life. As it turns out, the young C. bellis look a lot like the adults, just smaller. The newly-discovered young dino was about three years old at the time of its death, measuring about 5 feet (1.5 meters) long. Adults grew to be about 15 feet (5 meters) long, though the body plan is essentially unchanged. Other baby dinosaurs have proportionally longer legs to keep up with quick-moving adults, but that does not seem to be the case with this species.
The fossil was found in what used to be a riverbed. This has led Currie and his research team to believe that the baby didn’t die at the hands of a larger creature. It most likely wandered out too far into the water and got caught in the current. Unable to save itself, it drowned and settled at the bottom of the river, where it would eventually become fossilized in the sediment. The body was so well preserved, Currie was actually able to see impressions from the baby’s skin in the surrounding rock. The team hopes to use this fossil to gain a deeper understanding of how C. belli lived and how it existed in the context of its ecosystem.
- See more at: http://www.iflscience.com/plants-and-animals/new-baby-dinosaur-fossil-reveals-cause-death#sthash.6M3s821T.dpuf

Male and female brains wired differently, scans reveal

Maps of neural circuitry show women's brains are suited to social skills and memory, men's perception and co-ordination
Men women brains
Neural map of a typical man's brain. Photograph: National Academy of Sciences/PA
Scientists have drawn on nearly 1,000 brain scans to confirm what many had surely concluded long ago: that stark differences exist in the wiring of male and female brains.
Maps of neural circuitry showed that on average women's brains were highly connected across the left and right hemispheres, in contrast to men's brains, where the connections were typically stronger between the front and back regions.
Ragini Verma, a researcher at the University of Pennsylvania, said the greatest surprise was how much the findings supported old stereotypes, with men's brains apparently wired more for perception and co-ordinated actions, and women's for social skills and memory, making them better equipped for multitasking.
"If you look at functional studies, the left of the brain is more for logical thinking, the right of the brain is for more intuitive thinking. So if there's a task that involves doing both of those things, it would seem that women are hardwired to do those better," Verma said. "Women are better at intuitive thinking. Women are better at remembering things. When you talk, women are more emotionally involved – they will listen more."
She added: "I was surprised that it matched a lot of the stereotypes that we think we have in our heads. If I wanted to go to a chef or a hairstylist, they are mainly men."
Female brain 
  Neural map of a typical woman's brain. Photograph: National Academy of Sciences/PA
The findings come from one of the largest studies to look at how brains are wired in healthy males and females. The maps give scientists a more complete picture of what counts as normal for each sex at various ages. Armed with the maps, they hope to learn more about whether abnormalities in brain connectivity affect brain disorders such as schizophrenia and depression.
Verma's team used a technique called diffusion tensor imaging to map neural connections in the brains of 428 males and 521 females aged eight to 22. The neural connections are much like a road system over which the brain's traffic travels.
The scans showed greater connectivity between the left and right sides of the brain in women, while the connections in men were mostly confined to individual hemispheres. The only region where men had more connections between the left and right sides of the brain was in the cerebellum, which plays a vital role in motor control. "If you want to learn how to ski, it's the cerebellum that has to be strong," Verma said. Details of the study are published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
Male and female brains showed few differences in connectivity up to the age of 13, but became more differentiated in 14- to 17-year-olds.
"It's quite striking how complementary the brains of women and men really are," Ruben Gur, a co-author on the study, said in a statement. "Detailed connectome maps of the brain will not only help us better understand the differences between how men and women think, but it will also give us more insight into the roots of neurological disorders, which are often sex-related."

Science Reporter Emily Graslie Reads Her Mail — And It's Not So Nice

I've , so I'll say it again: Emily Graslie's "" is one of the warmest, slyest video blogs on the web. She's where I go to find out what museum scientists are up to — and right now she's at the Field Museum in Chicago, where she wanders from department to department, exploring, delighting, asking questions that you and I would ask if someone gave us a free pass to gawk our way through one of the great natural history museums in the world. So I was more than a little surprised to catch her recent post, a meditation on the mail she gets.
Emily Graslie - Brain Scoop
It turns out her mail is, well, troubling.
Many of the folks who write her, write not about the science, but about her body, her looks, her clothes, and do so without any apparent embarrassment. She's a science reporter who happens to be a young woman, and her woman-ness is the thing they focus on. The science, to her chagrin, often takes second place.
In her new video, Emily (with help from director and video editor Michael Aranda) gives us samples from her mailbox, She's not mad, not exactly. Instead, she just explains why these matter-of-fact little letter bombs make it harder for her to work, and how they hurt — every single day. And, being Emily, she explains it very well.

 

baby-dinosaur-fossil-reveals-cause-death

 

Einstein on Why We Are Alive



The meaning of human existence in five lines.
Given my soft spot for big thinkers’ answers to young people’s questions about life, I was thrilled when reader Dave Anderson shared the story of his mother’s exchange with none other than Albert Einstein. When Marion Block Anderson, an altogether exceptional woman, was a freshman at Oberlin College in 1951, she reached out to “the quintessential modern genius” and asked him, “Why are we alive?” She later told Dave about the impetus for her letter:
We were having one war after another — first we had the First World War, then we had the Second World War and I just couldn’t see any point to the whole thing. So I wrote him a letter and I said, “What’s the point of living with what we’re going through here — having one war after another?”
Lo and behold, Einstein wrote back. While short, his letter extends with exquisite precision both the answer to the question about the meaning of life and his views on religion:

Einstein, in fact, had the admirable habit of actually responding to many of the letters he received from his young admirers, the best of which are collected in Dear Professor Einstein: Albert Einstein’s Letters to and from Children (public library) — the same compendium that gave us Einstein’s heartening response to a little girl who wanted to be a scientist and his timeless answer to a child who wanted to know whether scientists pray.
Also see Einstein’s little-known correspondence with Freud on war and human nature and his remarkable conversation with Indian philosopher Tagore on truth, beauty, science, and spirituality.



http://www.bloglovin.com/frame?post=1953613239&group=0&frame_type=a&blog=6398135&link=aHR0cDovL2dnc3RlbS53b3JkcHJlc3MuY29tLzIwMTMvMTEvMjQvbWFyeS1qb3llLWJ1cm5zLw&frame=1&click=0&user=3334675

Mary Joye Burns

Image
Thank you to Cathleen Burns, who submitted this post about her mother, Mary Joye Burns (nee Geary), pictured above.  Cathleen says
she was a Medical Technologist at Emory University in 1950. She always wanted to be a doctor but her stepmother told her “Joye, women can’t be doctors!”, so she became a medical technologist instead.  She married my dad, who was able to become a doctor, and they were married 62 years until my father passed away this July.
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